CHRISTOPH HOELSCHER

CHAIR OF COGNITIVE SCIENCE ETH, ZURICH
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR OF COGNITION, PERCEPTION, AND BEHAVIOR IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS & CO-PI OF ENGAGING MOBILITY

FACTS

VISITING POSITIONS

University College London, honorary senior research fellow at the Bartlett School of Architecture / Space Syntax group (since 2007)

Visiting professor at UC Santa Barbara, departments of Geography and Psychology (2011 & 2012)

Visiting researcher and project manager at University of Freiburg / SFB/TR8 Spatial Cognition (2013-2014)

SERVICE ROLES

Governing board Cognitive Science Society (since 2012)

Board of directors SFB/TR8 Spatial Cognition (2007-2012)

Co-chair of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (2011, Boston)

Co-chair of Spatial Cognition International Conference (2010, Mt. Hood, OR)

BIOGRAPHY

Christoph Hölscher is professor of Cognitive Science at ETH Zurich. Christoph’s key research interests are: Wayfinding in Built Environments, Spatial Cognition & Usability Research for Architectural Design, Human Computer Interaction, User Modeling & Personalization, Information Retrieval & Web Search Behavior, Behavior Economics.

Cognitive Science aims to untangle the mental processes and structures underlying cognitive phenomena such as perception, learning, memory and reasoning. It views human cognition as information processing and provides an inter-disciplinary integration of approaches from cognitive psychology, informatics (e.g., artificial intelligence), neuroscience and anthropology among others.

 

The core mission of Christoph’s group at ETH is to help understand the complex interaction of humans and their physical, technical and social environment with an emphasis on cognitive processes and task-oriented behavior. In the area of human-computer interaction, this includes projects on how people interact with desktop computers and digital mobile devices. In the area of human spatial cognition, they emphasize collaboration with architectural design researchers on orientation and navigation in complex public buildings and urban environments. This is complemented by studies on the cognitive processes of architectural design thinking and creativity, especially on how designers anticipate user requirements, preferences and competencies.